Dr. Eowyn, The Trump Effect: America’s 50 safest cities

Dr. Eowyn

Yesterday, I did a post on the good news, ignored by the MSM, that in 2018, the United States had nearly the lowest violent crime rate in more than three decades, as far back as many Americans can remember, of 369 violent crimes reported for every 100,000 Americans.

Violent crimes rate is a population-adjusted measure of incidents of rape, robbery, homicide, and aggravated assault

A message for millennials: John Roman, a senior fellow with social research institution NORC at the University of Chicago, said: “If you are under the age of 40, you’ve never been safer than you are today.”

Using data from the FBI, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed violent crimes rates to identify America’s 50 safest cities. Only the 294 midsize and large cities tracked by the FBI with populations of at least 100,000 were considered.

Below are America’s 50 safest cities:

50. Boca Raton, Florida

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 204.7 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 2
  • Poverty rate: 8.4%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.1%

49. College Station, Texas

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 203.3 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 1
  • Poverty rate: 31.8%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 2.9%

48. Clovis, California

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 197.7 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 1
  • Poverty rate: 12.7%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.9%

47. Rochester, Minnesota

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 194.0 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 5
  • Poverty rate: 10.4%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 2.2%

46. Henderson, Nevada

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 188.3 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 15
  • Poverty rate: 9.1%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 4.4%

45. Torrance, California

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 181.7 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 2
  • Poverty rate: 7.2%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.8%

44. Pembroke Pines, Florida

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 181.4 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 1
  • Poverty rate: 8.4%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.1%

43. Centennial, Colorado

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 180.9 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 2
  • Poverty rate: 4.3%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 2.8%

42. Sterling Heights, Michigan

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 180.4 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 2
  • Poverty rate: 12.0%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.8%

41. Provo, Utah

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 175.4 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 2
  • Poverty rate: 25.4%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 2.7%

40. Simi Valley, California

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 168.2 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 0
  • Poverty rate: 6.2%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.1%

39. Scottsdale, Arizona

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 165.5 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 7
  • Poverty rate: 8.9%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.5%

38. Stamford, Connecticut

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 165.1 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 3
  • Poverty rate: 9.3%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.7%

37. Sunnyvale, California

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 163.8 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 1
  • Poverty rate: 6.6%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 2.2%

36. Rancho Cucamonga, California

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 161.9 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 1
  • Poverty rate: 8.4%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.1%

35. Santa Clara, California

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 161.6 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 1
  • Poverty rate: 7.7%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 2.4%

34. Alexandria, Virginia

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 159.9 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 4
  • Poverty rate: 10.5%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 2.2%

33. Meridian, Idaho

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 159.0 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 2
  • Poverty rate: 9.8%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 2.5%

32. Coral Springs, Florida

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 155.2 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 1
  • Poverty rate: 10.0%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.3%

31. Corona, California

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 154.7 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 6
  • Poverty rate: 11.6%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.3%

30. McKinney, Texas

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 151.9 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 0
  • Poverty rate: 7.0%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.5%

29. Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 142.3 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 3
  • Poverty rate: 7.6%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.0%

28. Cape Coral, Florida

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 142.1 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 3
  • Poverty rate: 12.7%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.4%

27. Plano, Texas

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 138.7 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 5
  • Poverty rate: 7.0%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.3%

26. Carrollton, Texas

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 138.2 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 5
  • Poverty rate: 10.1%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.2%

25. Santa Clarita, California

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 134.8 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 4
  • Poverty rate: 8.8%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 4.3%

24. Bellevue, Washington

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 132.1 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 0
  • Poverty rate: 7.4%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.2%

23. Lakewood Township, New Jersey

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 125.3 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 0
  • Poverty rate: N/A
  • 2018 unemployment rate: N/A

22. Round Rock, Texas

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 120.9 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 1
  • Poverty rate: 8.2%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 2.9%

21. Surprise, Arizona

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 120.8 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 7
  • Poverty rate: 9.1%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 4.7%

20. Amherst Town, New York

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 119.5 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 0
  • Poverty rate: N/A
  • 2018 unemployment rate: N/A

19. Temecula, California

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 119.4 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 0
  • Poverty rate: 6.8%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.5%

18. Edison Township, New Jersey

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 118.4 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 2
  • Poverty rate: N/A
  • 2018 unemployment rate: N/A

17. Sandy Springs, Georgia

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 117.8 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 2
  • Poverty rate: 11.2%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.1%

16. Virginia Beach, Virginia

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 117.1 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 7
  • Poverty rate: 8.0%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 2.9%

15. Orange, California

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 113.4 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 3
  • Poverty rate: 12.5%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 2.9%

14. Richardson, Texas

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 113.0 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 2
  • Poverty rate: 10.2%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.2%

13. Port St. Lucie, Florida

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 112.9 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 2
  • Poverty rate: 12.1%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.8%

12. Woodbridge Township, New Jersey

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 112.0 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 0
  • Poverty rate: N/A
  • 2018 unemployment rate: N/A

11. Allen, Texas

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 107.6 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 0
  • Poverty rate: 5.1%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.2%

10. League City, Texas

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 100.7 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 1
  • Poverty rate: 6.2%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.6%

9. Glendale, California

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 98.7 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 1
  • Poverty rate: 15.6%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 4.4%

8. Thousand Oaks, California

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 97.4 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 14
  • Poverty rate: 5.7%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.0%

7. Pearland, Texas

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 95.0 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 2
  • Poverty rate: 3.8%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.4%

6. Gilbert, Arizona

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 94.6 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 2
  • Poverty rate: 5.9%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.5%

5. Frisco, Texas

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 86.8 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 2
  • Poverty rate: 3.9%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.1%

4. McAllen, Texas

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 84.5 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 0
  • Poverty rate: 25.2%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 4.7%

3. Murrieta, California

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 80.2 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 2
  • Poverty rate: 8.9%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.5%

2. Naperville, Illinois

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 68.7 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 0
  • Poverty rate: 4.4%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 3.0%

1. Irvine, California

  • 2018 violent crime rate: 55.5 per 100,000 people
  • 2018 homicides: 0
  • Poverty rate: 13.2%
  • 2018 unemployment rate: 2.8%

On May 22, 2019, the New York Times published an op/ed admitting that Democrat-run cities are unlivable. Indeed, the city governments of the failed cities of Los Angeles and San Francisco are both run by all Democrats. (See my post on this here.)

Although elections of mayor and city councils are non-partisan, I thought it might be interesting to find out the political parties of the mayors and city council members of America’s top 5 safest cities. Their party ID information was very difficult to find. In some cases, I could find none.

(1) IRVINE, CALIFORNIA

Irvine is a city of more than 212,000 residents in Orange County, southern California, part of the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area. The City Council is comprised of the Mayor and four City Council members who are elected at large by registered voters of the City:

(2) NAPERVILLE, ILLINOIS

Naperville is a city of more than 141,000 people 28 miles west of Chicago in DuPage and Will counties, Illinois. The state’s 5th largest city, Naperville is the wealthiest city in the Midwest and the 11th wealthiest in the U.S.

Naperville has a council-manager local government. The City Council is comprised of the mayor and eight Councilmembers elected at large:

(3) MURRIETA, CALIFORNIA

Murrieta is a city of more than 103,000 people in Riverside County, in the center of the Los Angeles-San Diego mega-region in southern California.

Murrieta is represented by Republicans in the California State Senate and Assembly, as well as in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Murrieta has a council-manager type of local government:

(4) MCALLEN, TEXAS

McAllen is a city of more than 142,000 people in Hidalgo County in the Rio Grande Valley in the southern tip of Texas, about 70 miles west of the Gulf of Mexico.

McAllen is represented by all Democrats in the Texas State Senate and State House of Representatives.

McAllen has a council-manager type of government. Its City Commission is comprised of:

Note: There is no information on McAllen city government’s website on the members of its City Commission, other than their names and email addresses. No biographies. Nothing. News articles say voter turnout in McAllen is abysmal.

(5) FRISCO, TEXAS

Frisco is a city of more than 116,000 in in the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area in Collin and Denton counties, Texas, about 25 miles from the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.

Frisco has a council-manager type of government. Its City Council is comprised of:

~Eowyn

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4 thoughts on “Dr. Eowyn, The Trump Effect: America’s 50 safest cities”

  1. Disciplining or training a child and a dog are very different. A dog does not have language skills. Dogs are trained by physical action, not by talking to them [the average dog owner does not know that]. Once the dog knows the ”action”, they can then learn the word. A child knows what the word ”sit” means….dogs do not know what that word means when they are untrained in that specific action.

  2. DC must be off the charts for the verbal violence committed by the Dems in Congress against Trump these past 3 years. ….sure seemed like aggravated assault to me.

    In any case, once the commies/Dems see these figures, lest any congrats find its way to this administration, I am pretty sure they would want to include children being disciplined, slapping your dogs behind and that atrocious abusive behavior of not using the proper ‘new’ genderless pronoun in public.

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